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Rallo G, Hip Hop & The Culture. Bringing That Good Thing Back... Music


Rallo G started his entertainment career as an eager-beaver actor at the affectionate age of 9 years old. 

The kid was a natural who showed promise of being the next thespian ready to hit Hollywood, so Rallo’s mother decided to enroll him into the Youth Ensemble of Atlanta (GA), and that’s where he spent much of his time for the next few years. While there, he and a group of students would submerge into rap battles on sight.

He continued to do these unique odes until mastering the art of hip hop.

“I attended North Atlanta High School. I freestyled with other students while there. I formed a group called The Warriors, and then from 10th grade to 11th grade, we were "The "Unknown (MC's). I’ve been in love with it [hip hop] ever since,” he shared.

Clearly, music was his aphrodisiac. Occasionally, Rallo would perform a 10-minute set during lunch, where he’d stand on the table in front of his peers and reel off metaphors, bar-for-bar, with his classmates cheering him on. It was a scene straight out of the movie 8 Mile.

Unfortunately, Rallo ran into some trouble and left school. He transferred to Riverdale and then again to Tri-City High School.

“That’s the place where I met my man Tony Slayton. He took me to meet the Dungeon Family. I met Rico Wade. They were working on a record with Cool Breeze at the time. I got to chill with him and Kurupt. I got to see their creative process.

Although the meet and greet with the Dungeon Family seemed exciting, it was short lived. They didn’t have a whole lot time to nurture Rallo in the capacity that he needed, because they were still popular lyricist that were touring and hashing out music; however, they introduced him to Jimmy Swagger, who rapped with group, The Fourth Generation.

“That’s when it got serious. I started recording, doing mix-tape, and albums, right out of school. It had to be about 2001,” said Rallo.

Rallo met more strong influences like Bone Crusher, Killer Mike and T.I.

“We met a lot of people. Anybody in Atlanta that was doing something, we could rub elbows with them because of the situation I was put in. I started meeting people and my name started ringing bells. I had a group called Mamas Son, but we called it MaSon for short. We had a single out called, Still Riding Chevy’s. We were actually beating up the underground circuit in Atlanta before it was a lot of Open Mics and showcases.”

The group eventually dismantled and Rallo continued doing music as a solo artist. He flew on the radar and collaborated with other rappers form ATL.

“I never stopped. I’ve always loved hip hop. The culture is in me. I never took a break. I’m always on someone’s album, doing my own songs or working on a summer show somewhere.

It’s just the consistency and perseverance of being able to stay working no matter what I was going through. People respect it. Even, now, I’ve been in the game 12-years. I’ve been working with Mixx Mafia Radio and Celebrity DJ Cat X. I’ve been under management for a while.

Being with Mixx Mafia Radio and Celebrity DJ Cat X, as well as Angela Covington, has put fuel to the campaign. I really learned a lot while being under his guidance. They revived my whole career. That’s what gave me my second breath after the first run of doing music so long. Now, I can continue—They have a lot to do with that.”

As Rallo verbalized, he’s part of Mixx Mafia Radio, an internet based forum for independent artist.

“I’m the host now. It’s a great platform for artist. We have a lot of legendary people on there. We had Suga T on the show, and Kingpin Skinny Pimp recently. It’s real crazy because I’m able to learn so much from people who’ve been in the game for years; and have done this for years, while still being able to rub elbows and give knowledge that I’ve gotten along the years, to the younger guys that’s coming up. It’s a great situation for me because I’m in the middle of it; and by hosting, I’m able to chop it up with a lot of legends like Curtis Blow and Big Sam and the East Side boys. I’m constantly talking to someone and I’m always learning. I’m a sponge who’s able to soak up information in that situation. It just helps prepare me for my career… It gives me something else to do besides being an MC and rapping. I can focus on hosting and building my brand.”

The Atlanta native said that if he wasn’t rapping, he’d get his head-shots together, and start acting since Atlanta is the byproduct as well as the Metropolitan for film makers.

He said that he would love to work with Cool Breeze from the Dungeon Family because of the vision that they gave him as young guy coming up in the rap game.

“I actually got him on my first album. By him creating the words, “Dirty South,” and putting the whole project out there with Goodie Mob and OutKast, and me being able to connect to someone that’s tied to them, it’s just a good thing for me... especially, on the first record. I love it, and that’s one of my best collaborations. I would love to collaborate with Bob Marley and Tupac Shakur, but obviously, they have passed on. There’s a lot of talented people in the market. I would like to work with the people who were out when I was coming up in the rap game, people like Pimp C.”

Interestingly enough, when you think about Rallo's flow, it's much like predecessor Bun B from rap group UGK. Willing to bet that If opportunity presented itself, and he did get a chance to perform with Pimp C, the collaboration would be as fascinating as the Greatest American Eclipse of 2017. 

Rallo revealed that he was signed to his own record label, MaSon Inc. Entertainment.

“I’ve been learning the business, learning contracts and paperwork, just being more professional with how I conduct myself. I call myself Da Ambassador 2 Da Streetz—I was given that name because I’m able to connect with so many artist, networking, and putting artist on [in the music industry]. If I find a situation that they can benefit from, I’m open to help. I give information to up-and-coming artist like the ascap and BMI, the business side of the game."

Rallo received an award from the second annual Hip Hop honors for “Slept on Artist of the Year.”